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The Department of History

The Department of History offers a “bachelors of arts” and a “masters of arts” degrees in history and a “graduate certificate in public history.” We specialize in Southern history, Georgia history, women’s history, and military history, among other areas. For undergraduates, the Department participates in the University Honors College, and for graduate students the Department has several graduate assistantship opportunities.

Our faculty are engaging teachers and nationally and internationally known scholars in various historical fields. You will be in the classroom with award-winning teachers and scholars, taking a range of classes that satisfy just about any historical interest.

Why Study History?

In survey after survey, employers stress the need for people who think critically and write well. Rather than seeking job-specific skills, today’s lean corporations look for flexible problem solvers:

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“Employees with liberal arts majors have shown stronger management skills and have advanced further than those with other college majors.” – Bell Systems

“GM values a broad-based education that cultivates creative, analytical, and communication skills and encourages self-motivation, persistence, and self-discipline.” – General Motors, which employs more than 1,000 history majors.

History graduates work as analysts in business in government, as researchers, public relations officers, editors, teachers, sales executives, and managers. History is a preferred pre-law major, and two Georgia Southern history professors are also attorneys who give students expert advice on choosing classes and getting into law school. History majors also go to graduate schools in business, public administration, information science, education, and journalism, in addition to history.

History prepares students for careers in public history, including archival management, museum curatorship, and historic preservation.

More than dates and events, history gives us a broader view of our world. By understanding how people thought and acted across the ages in the different parts of the world, we can better understand the events of today and how we can influence tomorrow.

History majors analyze and interpret information, write and share ideas about why events happened and develop the knowledge and skills that help them to succeed in today’s workplace.

Faculty Expertise

All of the history faculty members at Georgia Southern University have earned the highest degrees in their fields. The department has an impressive 26 professorships as well as lecturers with diverse fields of expertise. The average class size is 24 students, ensuring that students receive one-on-one attention and develop strong working relationships with faculty.

Areas of expertise include ancient Greek and Roman, U.S. Colonial, modern European, Environmental, Maritime history, Maritime archaeology, Digital History, Public History Medieval Europe, Byzantium, Middle East, Latin-American, East Asian, African history, Religious history, as well as Gender studies, American Constitutional and Legal History, and African American history.

Recent Publications

Jeffrey D. Burson: The Rise and Fall of Theological Enlightenment
Kathleen Comerford: Reforming Priests and Parishes
Jonathan M. Bryant: How Curious A Land
William T. Allison: My Lai
James M. Woods: A History of the Catholic Church in the American South
William T. Allison: The Gulf War
James M. Woods: Rebellion and Realignment
Michael Van Wagenen: Remembering the Forgotten War
Craig H. Roell, Remember Goliad: A History of La Bahia (Austin: Texas State historical Association, 1994).
Anastatia Sims: The Power of Femininity in the New South
Sandra J. Peacock: Jane Ellen Harrison
Craig H. Roell: The Piano In America
Johnathan O'Neill (ed.): America and Enlightenment Constitutionalism
Johnathan O'Neill : Originalism in American Law and Politics
Emerson T. McMullen: William Harvey and the Use of Purpose in the Scientific Revolution
Craig H. Roell, Matamoros and the Texas Revolution (Denton: Texas State Historical Association Press, 2013).
Johnathan O’Neill, Constitutionalism in the Approach and Aftermath of the Civil War (North's Civil War)
Arthur Ashe: Tennis and Justice in the Civil Rights Era. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014.