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Costello to present at inaugural Comicana Conference

Dr. Lisa A. Costello, a longtime scholar of rhetoric, gender, and the Holocaust and was recently invited to present at the Inaugural Comicana Conference at Ole Miss University in Oxford, MS in October 2019. As part of a group of invited scholars chosen to punctuate this week long, cutting edge interdisciplinary conference on comics and graphic novels with keynote talks, Dr. Costello presented her work on the Holocaust and Maus in “Why Comics Matter: History and Memory in Art Spiegelman’s Maus,” in which she described the intersections of genre in this work and illuminated the ways in which Holocaust memory and history rely on a continual re-engagement of audiences with historical artifacts and multiple perspectives in new forms. Books like Maus use a combination of autobiography, comics, and oral testimony to engage Holocaust on a new level, and to allow broader audiences to connect with the history and memories of this collective trauma. 

Dr. Lisa A. Costello is a Professor in the Department of Writing and Linguistics and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) Director at Georgia Southern University. She is an interdisciplinary scholar who has published on rhetoric, gender and representation in Holocaust museums, memoirs, and new media, on First Year Writing and new media, and on feminist mentoring and university administrative structures. She has been a teaching fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She has been awarded several grants to further LGBTQ issues on campus, and has been honored with college and university level awards in both teaching and service. Her new book, American Public Memory: Performing Gender, Shifting Orientations was released October 2019.


Professor’s new book explores next generation Holocaust survivors

The recent, explosive rise of global antisemitism, Holocaust denial, and American white nationalism has created a dangerous challenge to Holocaust public memory on a scale without precedent. Dr. Lisa A. Costello’s new book, American Public Memory and the Holocaust, Performing Gender, Shifting Orientations, is a timely exploration of how next generation Holocaust survivors combine old and new media to bring newer generations of audiences into active engagement with Holocaust histories. Readers have been socialized to expect memorialization artifacts about the Holocaust to come in the form of established diaries, memoirs, photos, or documentaries in which gender is often absent or marginalized. This book shows a complex process of remembering the past that can positively shift our orientations toward others with greater affect. Using gender, performance, and rhetoric as a frame, Dr. Costello questions public memory as gender neutral while showing how new forms of memorialization, like digital archives, YouTube posts, hybrid memoirs, and small films build emotional connections that bring us closer to the past than ever before.

Dr. Lisa A. Costello is a Professor in the Department of Writing and Linguistics and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) Director at Georgia Southern University. She is an interdisciplinary scholar who has published on rhetoric, gender and representation in Holocaust museums, memoirs, and new media, on First Year Writing and new media, and on feminist mentoring and university administrative structures. She has been a teaching fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She has been awarded several grants to further LGBTQ issues on campus, and has been honored with college and university level awards in both teaching and service. American Public Memory is her first monograph.


Department of Communication Arts recognized for providing students with a grounding in media history

Photo from the American Journalism Historians Association report

The Georgia Southern Department of Communication Arts recently received an “A” grade for its commitment to providing its students with coursework in mass communication history. In a just-completed national study of more than 200 colleges and universities – conducted by the American Journalism Historians Association – Communication Arts has been named one of the top schools in the nation for educating its students in Journalism and Multimedia Film and Production in the comprehension of the historic foundations of their areas of study. At a time when some communication schools no longer provide students with a course in media history, Communication Arts believes it is critical for students to comprehend the basis on which current media practices are grounded in historic precedence. Georgia Southern Communication Arts joins such noteworthy universities as Northwestern, Michigan State and Missouri in achieving its ranking of excellence.      

Read the full report here. 


Georgia Southern Alumna Makes Book Tour Stop at The University Store

Georgia food writer and author Rebekah Faulk Lingenfelser will make a book signing tour stop at The University Store, 91 Georgia Ave., on the Statesboro campus of Georgia Southern University this Thursday, Oct. 17, from 4 – 6 p.m. 

Lingenfelser earned her Bachelor of Science in Public Relations from Georgia Southern University in 2005. She also attended the Culinary Institute of Savannah. A top 10 finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star and Season 2 of ABC’s The Taste, she is the longtime Statesboro Herald food columnist and a regular contributor for Southern Soil and Discovering Bulloch magazines.

Her debut memoir is titled “Some Kinda Good, Good Food and Good Company, That’s What It’s All About.” The 283-page book features 23 Southern, coastal recipes, 26 restaurant reviews and more than 100 color photographs. A compilation of short stories highlighting Lingenfelser’s national TV cooking competitions, her journey through culinary school, family traditions and hard-won life lessons, the book combines her Southern, coastal cooking style with a focus on Georgia grown, in-season ingredients. 

“Told with heart and mouthwatering detail, Rebekah Lingenfelser’s Some Kinda Good is like sharing a meal with your most knowledgeable food friend (who also sends you home with the best leftovers ever),” said Food Network Star Jessica Tom, author of Food Whore: A Novel of Dining and Deceit. “From the personal essays and restaurant reviews to the recipes, this is a book to savor.”

Some Kinda Good is available globally in hardback and eBook with major retailers such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble. For more information, including media opportunities and Lingenfelser’s book signing tour dates, visit RebekahLingenfelser.com or email RebekahFLingenfelser@gmail.com.   


A Moveable Feast 2019-2020

Thursday, Oct. 10, 6 p.m., The Jepson Center for the Arts, Savannah Portrait of the Icon as a Young Woman: Photography and the Making of Stardom

Presented by: Amanda Konkle, Department of Literature and Film Studies, and Bridgett Conn, Betty Foy Sanders Department of Art

The persona of the celebrity thrives on the tension between images of the public and private—or the performed and the authentic—self. This tension is frozen in time in the many star-studded portraits that comprise “Portrait of the Artist,” an exhibit of photographic portraiture currently on display at the Jepson Center for the Arts. In this lecture, Dr. Conn will discuss the various methods of creating portraits of the “real” person behind the star persona, dispelling the idea that a photographer need only be in the right place at the right time to capture a compelling image. “Behind-the-scenes” photos of stars “as they are” on set often reveal how the stars see themselves, rather than the roles they are scripted to play. As Dr. Konkle will discuss, this is heartbreakingly true for Marilyn Monroe, whose final film role put her in the position of confronting the star persona she had crafted through poised and polished photos with a raw, exposed version of herself as a young woman rather than a star. Together they will explore how the stars we think we see are often a fantasy created by the “ocular proof” of the camera’s lens.  

Sunday, Nov. 3, 5 p.m., The Mansion on Forsyth Park
Harnessing the Shadows: Ghosts, Vampires, and Undying Relationships to Our Past

Presented by: Alena Pirok, Department of History, and Kendra R. Parker, Department of Literature

Vampires, and ghosts, and us–oh my! In the spirit world of the Halloween season, Drs. Pirok and Parker invite you to embrace the shadows that represent our deepest fears in the stately and hauntingly beautiful Mansion on Forsyth Park. Dr. Pirok will examine the relationship between the Southern Gothic literary tradition and the development of Savannah’s ghost tourism, a development that has earned Savannah the claim of being “the most haunted city” in the country. She will explore how our streets are not haunted by individual specters but, by and large, by a mythical vision of Savannah’s own past. Dr. Parker will further trace how mythical recollections of an antebellum South, replete with its own tormented history, contribute to the post-emancipation stereotyping of Black people as vampiric predators. Together they will invite you to reconsider how stories of hauntings, vampires, and things undying shape our images of the past, our experiences of the present, and our apparitions of the future.

 Thursday, March 5, 2020, 6 p.m., The Temple Mickve Israel
Breaking Gendered Boundaries in Our Bones and Our Crimes

Presented by: Virginia Estabrook, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and Kate Perry, Department of Criminal Justice

We often hold profound expectations about gender that construct our judgements about the political and personal worth of others. This lecture will explore two distinct cases in which the rigidity of these expectations informs the way we respond to both historical and contemporary figures. Dr. Estabrook will focus on Savannah’s own Casimir Pulaski, whose remains have now been confirmed to have been buried beneath the monument in Monterey Square. Focusing on the forensic attributions of anthropologists, she will explore the complex issues that surround the history, anatomy, gender and myth-making unearthed in the bones of this Revolutionary War general. Dr. Perry, will shift the focus to contemporary issues and discuss the ways global norms about gender influence perceptions of and responses to gendered bodies. She will outline the experiences of women involved in human trafficking–discussing women as victims, perpetrators, law enforcement officers, NGO workers, and academics; emphasizing how the roles these women inhabit intersect with global norms about gender, political power, and security. Together these scholars will urge us to reconsider the boundaries of gender we have come to inhabit and see the worlds that are possible when we break them.

Thursday, April 23, 2020, 6 p.m., Savannah Cultural Arts Center
Shakespeare Near the Park

Presented by: Faculty from the Departments of Literature, Theater, and Music

Brush up your Shakespeare! Brighten up that Bard! Put a sparkle on the Swan of Avon! On this, the traditional date of Shakespeare’s birthday, the College of Arts and Humanities invites you to celebrate the occasion by sharing in a musical feast, where our faculty from the Departments of Literature, Theater, and Music will delight you in three Acts. The Literature faculty will open the curtain with a short introduction to Shakespeare, and throughout the gala they will offer brief background sketches for each of the selected scenes our troupe will perform. Act I will take you to a staged rendition of the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet, followed by a musical performance of “Tonight” from West Side Story. Act II will transport you to the “wooing” scene from The Taming of the Shrew, paired with a frolicsome version of “I Hate Men” from Kiss Me, Kate. The celebration will close with a reenactment from The Merry Wives of Windsor and a grand finale from Verdi’s opera, cameoing our very own Falstaff. And with that we’ll bid you adieu until next season!